Tag Archives: Bob Feller


Podcast: Baseball Author, Broadcaster Mr. Ed Randall: Baseball, Cancer and Life

Mr. Ed Randall speaks about his love of baseball while growing up, leading him to broadcast, report, and anchor professionally. He speaks about the challenges of reaching Major League Baseball, being grateful for his experiences and respecting the past. Mr. Randall shares his memory of making it to the Major Leagues when he filled in for Bob Shepherd, the legendary public address announcer at Yankee Stadium. Mr. Randall speaks about his close relationship with Baseball Hall of Famer Ernie Harwell and shares stories of National Baseball Hall of Famer and World War II and Korean War veteran Mr. Ted Williams. Hear about how Ed’s battle with prostate cancer has led him to help men understand that there is a 99% cure rate when cancer is detected early through testing.

“Ed Randall is the Founder and CEO of Fans for the Cure, a 501(c)(3) charity he started in 2003 to promote prostate cancer awareness, provide free PSA screenings, and focus on the importance of early detection in achieving best outcomes.

Since the start of the charity’s annual Baseball Road Trip in 2009, Fans for the Cure has conducted nearly 1,500 prostate cancer awareness days/nights at MLB and Minor League ballparks around the country. In cooperation with the teams’ healthcare partners and the charity’s network of physicians and hospitals, Fans for the Cure has provided over 5,000 PSA screenings as part of this program.

In addition to his work with Fans for the Cure, Ed just began his forty-sixth season in baseball broadcasting, hosting Remember When with Rico Petrocelli on Sirius XM as well as Ed Randall’s Talking Baseball on New York’s WFANThe author of three books about baseball, Ed’s most recent release is Baseball for the Utterly Confused, published by McGraw-Hill. His most notable collaboration was conducting the interviews with celebrity golfers and well-known PGA players that provided the content for The Best Golf Advice I Ever Received by Donald J. Trump. (Crown, 2005)

A graduate of Fordham University, Ed is a member of the school’s College Alumni Board as well as an inductee in the All Hallows High School Hall of Fame. Ed and his wife Louisa reside in Westchester County, New York” (Fansforthecure.org).

American Valor Podcast

Podcast: Mr. Carl Erskine: Jackie Robinson’s teammate, discipline, and change

“Baseball saw some of its biggest transformations in the 1940s and 50s. The introduction of night games, television, racial desegregation, and prevalence of jet travel all had a profound impact on how the game was forever played, observed, and experienced. Through these unprecedented times stood Carl Erskine, famed pitcher of the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers, and a witness to history.

Upon high school graduation in 1945, Erskine’s aspiration to play baseball came to a halt. With World War II in full swing, he was drafted into the U.S. Navy. A year later, Erskine introduced himself to the Navy recreation officer where he was stationed, and asked if he could play baseball. Already full of pitchers, he was turned away, but soon found consolation a few weeks later when scouted by the Dodgers and discharged from the Navy. Erskine spent the next year and a half in the minor leagues, at the time of widespread historical change in baseball.

While playing in 1947, baseball legend Jackie Robinson came on board the Brooklyn Dodgers as the first African American player in Major League history. After pitching in a challenging game in the spring of 1948, Robinson, who had watched Erskine pitch that game, befriended him and said, “You’re going to be with us real soon.” Truly inspired and with a great sense of optimism, Robinson’s prediction came true. Later that year, Erskine joined the Brooklyn Dodgers.

In the late ‘40s, television was beginning to permeate American society and millions of people started to see baseball in a new way. No longer restricted to archaic radio waves, the heroes of the sport now had faces to go along with their larger-than-life reputations–another milestone that would eternally change the nature of games.

Throughout the 1950s, air travel changed the way people moved across the country. With West Coast cities experiencing dramatic population increases, the major leagues started to expand. In 1957, the Dodgers left Brooklyn, New York and headed to California to become the Los Angeles Dodgers. Erskine, who did not like being away from his family, decided that relocating was not for him. He lasted only a year and a half and pitched his last game on June 4, 1959. His career spanned 12 seasons and accumulated 122 wins (.61).

After retiring from baseball, Erskine returned to his native Indiana and started his own insurance business in 1960. For 12 years, he coached the Anderson University Raven baseball program winning four championship games. While in the insurance business, he sharpened his business acumen and landed a job at Star Financial Bank serving as its president and director from 1982-1993. Erskine has also given his time and talents to many organizations, sitting on the board of trustees of Anderson University, St. John’s Medical Center, Fellowship of Christian Athletes and numerous other state and civic institutions.

Erskine was inducted into the Indiana National Baseball Hall of fame in 1979. In 2001, he wrote his first book, Tales from the Dodger Dugout, a collection of heartwarming stories recounting his days in the major leagues. Four years later, he penned his memoir, What I Learned from Jackie Robinson, sharing his memories of Jackie’s battle for racial equality and their enduring friendship that taught him important lessons about life.

The unique perspective of Erskine during baseball’s transformative years is a good reminder that change is something not to fear, but embraced with an open mind and heart (from CarlErskine.com).”

American Valor Podcast

Podcast: Mrs. Anne Feller on Mr. Bob Feller’s Legacy

We were very fortunate to feature Mrs. Anne Feller, the widow of Mr. Bob Feller, on the American Valor Podcast. Mrs. Feller shares incredible stories of Mr. Feller’s recollection of his experiences in World War II and pride in his country, sharing insight into what made individuals like Mr. Feller and World War II and Korean War veteran Mr. Ted Williams so special.

Afterwards, hear about the upcoming baseball season.

American Valor Podcast

Podcast: Sports Journalist Ms. Lindsay Berra on Grandfather Yogi

On the American Valor Podcast, Sports Journalist Lindsay Berra spoke about her career decision and experience covering sports at the highest levels. She talks about lessons learned from her grandfather Yogi, one of the greatest baseball catchers of all time: humility, integrity, citizenship, treating all people equally, and many more. One special story includes Yogi’s reflection on his military service during World War II after watching the movie Band of Brothers. Mr. Berra did not frequently speak about his time in the military. Lindsay shares with listeners the wisdom of Yogi-isms, the educational components of the Yogi Berra museum, and how sports like baseball help to build communities.

“Lindsay Berra is a freelance sports journalist based in Montclair, NJ. At MLB.com from January 2013 through January 2018, she established herself as an authority on baseball fitness and injuries and appeared frequently on MLB Network to discuss her stories. From 1999 through 2012, she was a senior writer for ESPN Magazine, covering primarily ice hockey, tennis, baseball and the Olympics. Lindsay received her undergraduate degree in journalism from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she played varsity softball and men’s club ice hockey. She is the oldest grandchild of Yogi and Carmen Berra and is a board member at the Yogi Berra Museum and Learning Center in Little Falls, NJ” (lindsayberra.com).

American Valor Podcast

Author Anne Keene: Baseball and Military in World War II

Author Anne Keene began her career as a writer after graduating from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a journalism degree.

Anne’s father was a batboy for the Cloudbuster Nine, a World War II team of fighter-pilot cadets at an elite Navy training school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. After her father’s passing, Anne began a research project on the Major League Baseball players who attended the training school that shaped the lives of many well-known individuals. Her book, The Cloudbuster Nine, was named as a finalist for the 2018 CASEY Award for “Best Baseball Book of the Year.”

Keene shares incredible stories and lessons learned from her conversations with surviving Major League Baseball World War II veterans. Common values of these individuals include fearlessness, pride in the military and service, generosity, service-oriented, modesty, humility, appreciation of freedom, clarity of beliefs, and respect for authority and leadership. Anne’s research reminds listeners of the importance of positive values and a desire to help others and make the world a better place.

To learn more about Author Anne Keene and her work on baseball and the military, please visit her website: https://www.annerkeene.com/

Image: Anne Keene’s father receiving lessons from Boston Red Sox Ted Williams and Johnny Pesky

American Valor Podcast

American Values, Leadership, and the Power of the Individual: 75th Secretary of the Navy the Honorable Ray Mabus

On the twentieth episode of the American Valor Podcast, we are honored to be joined by the 75th Secretary of the Navy: the Honorable Ray Mabus. “Mr. Mabus served as the 75th United States Secretary of the Navy, the longest to serve as leader of the Navy and Marine Corps since World War I. Throughout his tenure, Secretary Mabus has focused on four key priorities – People, Platforms, Power and Partnerships – that enable the Navy and Marine Corps’ unique ability to maintain the global presence that reassures our allies and deters our adversaries.

Before his appointment by President Obama, Mabus held a variety of leadership positions. From 1988 to 1992, Mabus served as Governor of Mississippi, the youngest elected to that office in more than 150 years. Mabus was Ambassador to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from 1994-1996 and later was Chairman and CEO of a manufacturing company which he led out of bankruptcy.

Mabus has been recognized for his leadership of the Navy and Marine Corps on multiple occasions. In 2013, he was named one of the top 50 highest rated CEOs by Glassdoor, an online jobs and career community. Mabus was the only person in government to receive this award.

Secretary Mabus is a native of Ackerman, Mississippi, and received a Bachelor’s Degree, summa cum laude, from the University of Mississippi, a Master’s Degree from Johns Hopkins University, and a Law Degree, magna cum laude, from Harvard Law School. After Johns Hopkins, Mabus served in the Navy as an officer aboard the cruiser USS Little Rock” (defense.gov).

Mabus encourages listeners to believe you can do whatever you put your mind to. He describes being in the United States Navy as one of the defining experiences of his life, teaching Mr. Mabus what it means to be part of a team.

Mr. Mabus preaches the importance of being honest. He states that Americans must stand for equality, democracy, openness, and freedom of expression across the world. Our strength as a nation lies in our values and what we have stood for since 1776.

Ray Mabus’ three traits of a leader:

  1. Know what you are willing to lose.
  2. Set an example for others to follow.
  3. Be very clear. Know why you are doing what you are doing.

https://www.buzzsprout.com/316250

Memories of Bob Feller: a Lifetime of Service with the USS Alabama’s Bill Tunnell

Mr. Bill Tunnell served as the Executive Director of USS Alabama Battleship Memorial Park until 2015, a total of 19 years. Bill oversaw the maintenance and expansion of one of the last remaining Battleship museums left in the world. Over the course of his career, Bill met and spoke personally with National Baseball Hall of Famer and proud veteran of the United States Navy, Chief Petty Officer Bob Feller, developing a personal relationship with Mr. Feller. Mr. Tunnell was honored to speak at Mr. Feller’s memorial service in 2010.

Mr. Tunnell shares stories and lessons of the USS Alabama battleship, including service to country, America’s military, and the incredible life and legacy of Chief Petty Officer Bob Feller. Some values of those who served on the ship include comradeship, brotherhood, and patriotism. Bill exclaims a job and life very well done for Bob Feller.

The Battleship Memorial Park has welcomed hundreds of thousands of visitors each year since 1965: “More than fifteen million visitors later and a statewide economic impact approaching one billion dollars, the Park is easily the most recognizable symbol of the State of Alabama. Dedicated to all Alabama Citizens who have worn the uniform of all branches of the United States Armed Forces, the Park’s numerous artifacts, exhibits, and displays all point to the fact that the Park is America’s most unique military attraction” (ussalabama.com).

Bill Tunnell attended the University of the South, majoring in history with an emphasis on American History. Bill has served in various business roles throughout his career. Tunnell was named “Honorary Veteran” by the South Alabama Veterans Council and was the first inductee into the Alabama Tourism Hall of Fame.

American Valor Podcast

 

American Valor Podcast: MLB Veteran Doug Flynn on Baseball, Big Red Machine, Community Service

Mr. Doug Flynn is the latest person to join the American Valor Podcast!

Doug Flynn grew up playing several sports in Lexington, Kentucky. He attended the University of Kentucky and Somerset Community College before playing 11 seasons in Major League Baseball for the New York Mets, Montreal Expos, Cincinnati Reds, Texas Rangers and Detroit Tigers. Mr. Flynn was a member of the 1975 Big Red Machine team that won the World Series. He is currently a broadcaster for the Cincinnati Reds and actively supports service men and women through multiple non-profit organizations, including Hope for the Warriors (supporting injured veterans and their families) at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune in North Carolina, USACares (supporting family members of military personnel) and Save the Warriors (supporting veterans with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder/PTSD).

Mr. Flynn speaks about his blessed childhood growing up in Kentucky and the impact of playing several sports including basketball and baseball at the University of Kentucky. He shares stories of trying out for the Cincinnati Reds and his tribulations rising through the team’s minor league system before playing with the Big Red Machine and National Baseball Hall of Fame managers Sparky Anderson and Joe Torre in his Major League career. Doug shares lessons learned from some of the greatest coaches and players of his generation.

Doug preaches playing for the team name on the front of the jersey rather than the name on the back and speaks to the importance of community involvement, sharing stories of his support for service men and women, often with his good friend National Baseball Hall of Famer and Bob Feller Award recipient Mr. Johnny Bench. Hear Mr. Flynn’s thoughts on the current state of the game of baseball and his experience of going on tour with the Oak Ridge Boys during the 1981 Major League Baseball players’ strike.

American Valor Podcast

American Valor Podcast: Semper Fi with Marine Corps Reserve Major Chad Lennon

Marine Corps Reserve Major Chad Lennon speaks about his decision to join the Marine Corps and his service in both the active and reserve components of the Marine Corps, as well as his decision to attend law school. In 2010, Major Lennon deployed to Afghanistan, receiving the Purple Heart and Navy/Marine Corps Achievement Medal for his service to our country. Major Lennon then earned his Doctor of Law degree from the Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center, where he currently serves as Director of the Veterans and Servicemembers’ Rights’ Clinic.

Major Lennon encourages individuals interested in the military to research the four branches and speaks about the close connection among members of the military and the significance arising from service to others and country.

As an advisor to the Bob Feller Act of Valor Award Foundation and a community athlete for the Semper Fi Fund, an organization assisting injured veterans in all branches of the armed forces, Major Lennon became a Guinness World Record holder in the summer of 2019. His effort to earn the fastest one mile time pulling a 400 pound chain raised over $6,000 for the Semper Fi Fund.

Hear Major Lennon discuss the the Marine Corps slogan Semper Fi…Always Faithful.

Listen to the episode wherever you find podcasts, or on our website: https://actofvaloraward.org/american-valor-podcast/

Vice Admiral Jay Donnelly: Submarines, Service to Others and Valor

Vice Admiral Donnelly speaks about what it means to be part of a three generation Naval family and the values he developed at the Naval Academy: integrity, honor and service above one’s self. Learn about life on a submarine and the rationale behind the decisions to allow women to serve in the submarine force and the elimination of smoking on submarines.

Vice Admiral Donnelly encourages young people to start their career in the military because it prepares one for success in life. Military service is an opportunity to develop self-discipline, teamwork and the other skills critical for success in any field: communication, leadership, integrity, doing things right and doing hard things well.

For Vice Admiral Donnelly, valor is the application of sacrifice and service to others in a time of great peril. To live with valor means to act with valor.

Donnelly lives in Annapolis, Maryland with his wife of 39 years. They have three married children who each became naval officers following college. They are happily accumulating grandchildren.

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